Francis Ford
Frank Thomas Feeney
14 August 1881, Portland, Maine
5 September 1953, Los Angeles, California
According to Gary Wills' "John Wayne's America," John Ford kept his brother Francis as part of his stock company partly for the reason so he could humiliate him by giving him small, meaningless roles and yelling at him on the set. The younger Ford could not handle feelings of indebtedness, which was one of the reasons he never worked with Harry Carey, except once, in the quarter century after Carey left Universal. Carey was given the role of the prison warden and Francis Ford the role of a corporal of the guard in John Ford's The Prisoner of Shark Island (1936).
I don't know what that Method is. Acting is life, to me, and should be.
Vivien Leigh
Francis Ford (born Francis Feeney, August 14, 1881 – September 5, 1953) was a prolific film actor, writer, and director. He was the mentor and older brother of film director John Ford. He also appeared in many of John Ford's movies, including Young Mr. Lincoln and The Quiet Man.

Francis Ford was born in Portland, Maine. He was the son of John A. Feeney, who was born in the village of Spiddal, County Galway, Ireland, on June 15, 1854. By 1878, John had moved to Portland, Maine and opened a grocery store, at 42 Center Street, that posed as a front for a saloon. John opened four others in following years.

After service in the infantry in the Spanish-American war, Francis left home. He drifted into the film business in New York City, working for David Horsley, Al Christie, and the Star Film Company's San Antonio operation under Gaston Méliès. He adopted the name Ford from the automobile.  From San Antonio Francis began his Hollywood career working for Thomas H. Ince at Ince's Bison studio, directing and appearing in westerns.

Francis Ford's younger brother, John M. Feeney, was a successful fullback and defensive tackle on a Portland High state championship football team, nicknamed "Bull". In 1914 Bull followed Francis to Hollywood, changed his name to John Ford and would eventually surpass his older brother's considerable reputation.

Francis Ford's son, Philip Ford, was also a film actor/director.

Ford acted in over 400 films altogether, with many of his early credits poorly documented and likely lost.

Ambitious and prolific, in Ford's early work he cast himself as George Armstrong Custer, Sherlock Holmes (with his younger brother as Dr. Watson), and Abraham Lincoln, a role which he specialized in. By 1912 Ford was directing alongside Thomas Ince. It rapidly became clear that Ince was characteristically taking credit for Ford's work,  so Ford moved to Universal in early 1913. His 1913 Lucille Love, Girl of Mystery was Universal's first serial, and the first of a string of very popular serials starring Ford's collaborator and lover Grace Cunard. The 1915 serial The Broken Coin was expanded from 15 to 22 episodes by popular demand, probably the height of Ford's career.

In 1917 Ford founded a short-lived independent company, Fordart Films, which released the 1918 Berlin via America with Phil Kelly, and briefly opened his own studio at Sunset Boulevard and Gower Street. At the same time Ford mentored his younger brother, collaborating frequently as writers, directors, and actors in each other's projects. But as early as 1917, it was clear that John's star was on the rise. Frank's directorial style remained suitable for serials, but failed to evolve.  Ford's final known directoral credit is for the 1928 The Call of the Heart, a 50-minute vehicle for "Dynamite the Devil Dog".

The Ford brothers were, at the best of times, critical of each other, and sometimes sharply antagonistic. Ford wrote an unpublished memoir in 1934 called "Up and Down the Ladder" which is "filled with bitter and sometimes heartrending complaints about how old-timers who had helped create the industry had been shunted aside by younger men."

From the late 1920s, and for the next two decades, Ford sustained a career as a grizzled character actor and bit player. He is often uncredited, as in his appearance in James Whale's 1931 Frankenstein. Among his most memorable roles was that of the demented old man in The Ox-Bow Incident (1943).
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